beliefs and myths from ancient times

I'm Jasmina (also called Jassie).

I'm from Denmark, and I blog about mythologies (mainly Greek, Norse, and Egyptian), religions, superstitions, etc.

I am a Hellenic polytheist in the religion known as Hellenismos - the traditional, polytheistic religion of ancient Greece.

You are very welcome to ask me anything, or request a post about a specific myth or mythical character, but please check the Greek Deities page and the Myths and Deities page before requesting something :)

Note: I usually post or reblog something every other day.
In Greek mythology and religion, Hebe is the goddess of youth.She is the daughter of Zeus and Hera, or, in some versions, just Hera when she ate a lettuce head.
Hebe was the cupbearer for the gods and goddesses of Mount Olympus, serving their nectar and ambrosia, until she was married to Herakles (Roman equivalent: Hercules); her successor was Zeus’s lover Ganymedes. Another title of hers, for this reason, is Ganymeda.She also drew baths for Ares and helped Hera enter her chariot.Hebe had two children with Herakles: Alexiares and Anicetus.
The name Hebe comes from Greek word meaning “youth” or “prime of life”.In art, Hebe is usually depicted wearing a sleeveless dress.
Hebe was also worshipped as a goddess of pardons or forgiveness; freed prisoners would hang their chains in the sacred grove of her sanctuary at Phlius.

In Greek mythology and religion, Hebe is the goddess of youth.
She is the daughter of Zeus and Hera, or, in some versions, just Hera when she ate a lettuce head.

Hebe was the cupbearer for the gods and goddesses of Mount Olympus, serving their nectar and ambrosia, until she was married to Herakles (Roman equivalent: Hercules); her successor was Zeus’s lover Ganymedes. Another title of hers, for this reason, is Ganymeda.
She also drew baths for Ares and helped Hera enter her chariot.
Hebe had two children with Herakles: Alexiares and Anicetus.

The name Hebe comes from Greek word meaning “youth” or “prime of life”.
In art, Hebe is usually depicted wearing a sleeveless dress.

Hebe was also worshipped as a goddess of pardons or forgiveness; freed prisoners would hang their chains in the sacred grove of her sanctuary at Phlius.

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    [HEBE INTENSIFIES]
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  14. aliciadawn21 reblogged this from classicsenthusiast and added:
    Hold the fuck up. Hera birthed this kid after she ate LETTUCE??? Nothing is safe in Greek mythology.
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    In Greek mythology and religion, Hebe is the goddess of youth.
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